New Blog

This is THE PLACE for incredible feats, classic and unique equipment, advertisements, magazine covers, Olympic Champions, gymnastics, myths and legends, oldtime physical culture and everything else you can think of having to do with the history of physical training! -- There ain't nothin' like it anywhere else! You'll want to check back several times per day, we update often.

Keep in mind that what you see on this page only the tip of the iceberg, check our Archive Section for all our back posts. If you are looking for any subject in particular, please try our Search page

If you want to "like" this section of our blog, please use the button above, otherwise, each individual post has it's own unique "like" button located in the upper right. Please share anything you find of interest with anyone you know who might like it!

Batta

Charles Estienne, or or, as he was more commonly known "Batta" was an oldtime strongman famous for his incredible grip strength. Standing at 5'10" and a bodyweight of around 190 popunds, Batta was the only man who duplicated one of the Apollon's greatest feats: the lifting of four 44-pound blockweights overhead -- each tied to a finger of one hand. It was also written that Batta cleaned (but did not jerk) Apollon's famous railroad wheels - an incredible feat in its own right, but even more so due to his light bodyweight.

Larry Scott and Betty Weider

Larry Scott and Betty Weider on the cover of the French magazine "Atout Muscles" (Muscle Strength). This was the January, 1970 issue and I believe the premier issue -- only a handful of issues were published so this title is a hard one to find. If you happen to have a copy, you'll be lucky enough to read training articles on Franco Columbu's arms, Frank Zane's back and Arnold Schwarzenegger's chest.

The Mike Marvel DYNAFLEX Course!

Straight from the back of nearly every single comic book ever printed from the early 50's to the mid 70's comes the World Famous Mike Marvel DYNAFLEX Course! No telling how many youngsters saved up their paper route money to send away for this one but it was undoubtedly quite a few. The course itself has an interesting "take" on working out and if nothing more, was an important stepping stone for a lot of folks into other aspects of physical training.

Staff Sgt. Moss

Staff Sgt. Alfred Moss was an early bodybuilder, circa 1900. Believe it or not, Moss' tattoos often disqualified him from several contests despite his obvious muscularity. Sergeant Moss was considered the Strongest man in the British Army, once jerking a 56-pound blockweight 100 times in 2 minutes 52 seconds.

Moss went on to write several training courses covering the parallel bar, vaulting horse, indian clubs, rings, tumbling and other gymnastic subjects.

Grimek on Iron Man

John Grimek appeared on the cover of Iron Man magazine ten times. The January, 1954 issue shown above was the final occasion. Grimek was 44 years of age at the time and clearly hadn't missed many workouts.

Rope Climbing for Grip Strength

Sig Klein was always outspoken as far as the importance of grip strength... One of Sig's favorite exercises was to hang by one hand from a thick climbing rope. It's still a good one.

Ab Training: Shaolin Style

How do Shaolin Monks train their abs? Here's one way: this fellow is hanging upside down with his legs over a tree branch. He fills a small cup with water from the jar below him, sits up, and dumps it into a bucket which hangs above. No sets and reps needed, the workout ends when the bucket is filled.

Lee "Strongman" Jones

Lee "Strongman" Jones does his thing back in the mid-1950's. We don't know anything about the man other than he obviously has a pretty strong set of choppers.

Ironman Magazine April, 1952: Cover Man Zabo Zoszewski

Irvin 'Zabo' Koszewski on the cover of the April, 1952 issue of Ironman Magazine. He finished 5th at the 1952 Mr. America Contest although to no ones's surprise, took home the 'Best Abs' subdivision.

Zabo was a safe bet for an Abs trophy, in fact he won "Best Abs" in every bodybuilding contest he ever entered, including four times in the AAU Mr. America contest and three times in the Junior Mr. America Contest.

Mr. America '68, Jim Haislop

Jim Haislop, the popular bodybuilder from Tampa, Florida, shows the foundation of his development: squats. Haislop had quite a career, winning Mr. Florida in 1965, Mr. North America in 1966, Mr. Northern States and Mr. USA in 1967, Mr. America and Junior Mr. America in 1968 and took first in his class at the 1969 NABBA Mr. Universe.
Syndicate content