New Blog

This is THE PLACE for incredible feats, classic and unique equipment, advertisements, magazine covers, Olympic Champions, gymnastics, myths and legends, oldtime physical culture and everything else you can think of having to do with the history of physical training! -- There ain't nothin' like it anywhere else! You'll want to check back several times per day, we update often.

Keep in mind that what you see on this page only the tip of the iceberg, check our Archive Section for all our back posts. If you are looking for any subject in particular, please try our Search page

If you want to "like" this section of our blog, please use the button above, otherwise, each individual post has it's own unique "like" button located in the upper right. Please share anything you find of interest with anyone you know who might like it!

Big Paul's Wheels

Big Paul and his famous wheels

Big Paul and His Famous Wheels

What do you do when you need to squat over 600 pounds but a normal barbell just won't hold enough weight? -- Keep in mind that they didn't have 100 lb. plates back then either. This was Paul Anderson's solution, a set of wheels he found in a junk yard in his native town of Toccoa, Georgia.

At first, everybody thought he was crazy but they changed their tune when he came home from the 1956 Olympics with a shiny new Gold Medal. I don't know of anyone who looked as relaxed as Big Paul while handling big weights.

That's also another pretty good lesson: if you don't have what you need you'll have to improvise...

York Deep-Dish 45-Pound Barbell Plates

This is what 45-pound barbell plates looked like way back in the day. If you have some, count yourself lucky, they started disappearing in the 1960's when The York Barbell Company came out with a more streamlined plate (they could only fit so many of these on a bar with guys like Wilbur Miller around). Two great grip strength challenges either to lift one of these plates by the hub or pinch grip a pair of them.  You've got a pretty strong pair of mitts if you can do both...

British Champion T.W. Clarke

T.W. Clarke, February, 1933 Strength and Health
T.W. Clarke

The 11 stone British Amateur Weightlifting Champion of 1913, T.W. Clarke is shown here on the cover of the February, 1933 issue of Strength and Health Magazine (Making this is the third issue ever.) Clarke was famed for his arm development - 15-1/4 inches - which was quite impressive for a man of his size and weight class.

Clarke trained at the Camberwell Weightlifting Club and was coached by "The Wizard of Weightlifting" W.A. Pullum.

The Hammer Strength Wrist Curl

The Hammer Strength Wrist Curl
The Hammer Strength Wrist Curl

There's no question that the barbell wrist curl has been and can be a very effective method for building wrist strength -- but that doesn't mean it can't be improved upon. This nifty piece of training equipment from Hammer Strength offers the ability to do something that no barbell can match: negative accentuated training capability i.e. lift with two hands then lower with one... a technique very much worth experimenting with, if you happen to be lucky enough to have access to one of these devices.
Syndicate content